PHYSICS ANALYSIS OF MOUSETRAP CAR

The Physics Analysis section is divided into two parts:

1. CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS
These questions are designed to demonstrate your understanding
and application of the Physics principles learned in the Mechanics I
and II courses. Answer the questions in detail using full sentences.
Pay special attention to the words: describe, discuss and explain.
2. PRACTICAL ANALYSIS
You must design, and conduct an experiment with your car that
illustrates a Physics principle covered in class. Suggested topics
of exploration are: Kinematics, Forces, Work, Energy, and/or
Momentum.
PART I. CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS  60%

1. What are the two types of friction that affect the performance of your
   car?

2. What problems related to friction did you encounter and how did you  
    solve them?

3. How many wheels does your car have?
   What factors did you take into account to decide the number of
    wheels?

4. What kind of wheels did you use in each axle?
   What is the effect of using large or small wheels?

5. Explain how Newton's first, second and third  laws apply to the
   performance of a car.

6. Discuss the effect of the length of the lever arm in the pulling force of
   your car.

7. How does the distribution of weight of the car affect the traction of the
   wheels?

8. Discuss how the length of the lever arm is related to the power output
  of your car.

9. Discuss the major problems encountered in the performance of your
   car and what did you do to solve them.
PART II. PRACTICAL ANALYSIS 40%

The objective is to design a lab to determine an unknown quantity experimentally. You may not damage any of the equipment you use,
and your method must be feasible and practical.

Your lab report must include the following:

- List the equipment you would need, and include a labeled diagram.
- Write a brief but concise procedure, describing any measurements you
  would make, assigning each measurement a symbol (example: time = t ) .
- Show explicitly using equations how the measured quantities would be
  used to determine the unknown quantity.
- Collect data.
- Analyze data including calculations and/or graphs as appropriate.
- Draw a conclusion.
- Indicate one possible source of experimental error.